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Congratulations, Samuel Leadismo!

Congratulations, Samuel Leadismo!

In the last few years, SIA has begun supporting more of our partner organizations with grants for staff salaries. Grants for overhead?? Isn't it better to pay for programs or tangible objects, rather than overhead? We've found that where there is dedicated, well-paid staff, grassroots efforts are able to thrive in a consistent way. Rather than seeing it as a waste, we see it as investing in and honoring the people that bring our vision of a better world into reality, while also making sure they support themselves and their families. Samuel Siriria Leadismo, Co-founder and Director of Pastoralist Child Foundation (PCF) in Samburu, Kenya is one of these people who is putting SIA into action, and who is compensated by a SIA grant for his salary. It's not just SIA that sees the amazing work he does to advocate for girls in Kenya. Last week, Samuel received a prestigious recognition award from Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta! From Pastoralist Child Foundation's Founder and President, Sayydah Garrett: On Friday, Samuel Siriria Leadismo, PCF's Co-founder & Director received a prestigious recognition award from Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta! Samuel was recognized and awarded for his dedication and hard work to end female genital mutilation (FGM). Speaking during the virtual launch of the Kenyan chapter of Generation Equality Forum at State House, Nairobi, President Kenyatta enumerated various initiatives the government had put in place to ensure gender equity and empowerment of women and girls. He said women are a critical national asset with great potential to shape, influence, and contribute to all spheres of development, and that empowering them strengthens the family, society, and the nation at large. “When countries respect women's rights, promote gender equality, and put women and girls at the centre of their development agenda, their societies and economies thrive, and those benefits extend far into future generations," the President said. "Equally important to highlight is that cultural and religious leaders from the Borana, Samburu, and Pokot communities have made bold public declarations to eliminate FGM and child marriage. This includes the 'Kisima Declaration' which I witnessed in Samburu in March of this year,” President Kenyatta said. The award to Samuel was presented by CS Margret Kobia, PS Collete Suda, Diplomatic Corps, UN Women country reps, UNFPA country reps, Anti-FGM Board and National stakeholders from the Ministry of Public Service and Gender during the launch of the Kenyan chapter of the #GenerationEquality towards the commitments of the #BeijingDeclaration in 1995. (Pictured: Janet recently graduated from high school and is continuing on to university with the support of a sponsor through PCF! She is a role model for girls in their villages.) PCF has made great strides in its efforts to end FGM and child marriage. How gratifying to be recognized by the President of Kenya! Our eternal gratitude to Samuel for all he does to advance our mission! You can read more about the work, projects, and education initiatives of Pastoralist Child Foundation here. SIA has also supported the building of a curio/jewelry shop for Samburu women through PCF. *Photos used with permission from Pastoralist Child Foundation. Thank you! #overhead #SIAgrantpartners #administrativeexpenses #trustbasedphilanthropy #kenya #pcf #antiFGM

Spring Newsletter! Read success stories, community impact, and what inspires our grant partners

Spring Newsletter! Read success stories, community impact, and what inspires our grant partners

The 2021 Spring & Summer newsletter is here! Ubuntu Community Organization opened their new brightly-painted office in Githurai, Kenya. Ubuntu’s leader, Lilian (in the polka-dotted shirt) has enlisted volunteers to support women in the community. This will also be a place where people can use the internet and access low-interest loans. In this newsletter we feature: Zoom Trainings for SIA Grassroots Partners A Tragedy That Changed My Life - by Fulgence Ndagijimana, SIA Grant Partner and African Advisory Board Member Photo collage of SIA Partners and their community impact Inspiration from Del Anderson, relevant to our times of pandemic Read the full newsletter and donate now to support the work of Spirit in Action. Thank you for supporting the work of our partners for more justice in the world! "My work is to make sure people can see a light at the end of the tunnel. My experience as a refugee, torture survivor and immigrant informs the work I do, and it was born out of my experience. I would not wish that experience to anyone, but I strive to ensure that mine did not happen in vain." - Fulgence Ndagijimana (Read the full story in the newsletter) #newsletters #inspiration #DelAnderson #refugees

Farming in the dry Kerio Valley

Farming in the dry Kerio Valley

Samuel and Rhoda Teimuge of Eldoret, Kenya have been part of Spirit in Action since the very beginning. As friends of Del Anderson, they advised him on the best ways to support economic empowerment in Kenya. They all shared a passion for promoting self-sufficiency and sustainability, especially in terms of growing food and rearing animals, and farming in ways that preserve soil health. As we welcome Samuel and Rhoda as SIA Emeritus Board Members, I share their latest adventures in farming. Here is Samuel’s update: Mama Kigen (Rhoda)*, Timothy (my son) and I have moved to Kerio Valley, in the Rift Valley of Kenya. Tim is training on becoming a young farmer, taking a course in Agribusiness. Mama Kigan is raising chickens, and we are planting pixie orange trees and growing vegetables. The area is in a very rural area between Iten and Kabarnet, to the east of Eldoret. It looks like we shall have short rains this year and the Valley is very, very hot. The Teimuge's new home out in the Kerio Valley with the Tugen Hills to the east. No one lives around us – only goats and cows. This area is actually a grassing field for grazing. People come in the morning to release their goats, then they go back home until evening when they come to lock them. Our property is fenced with chain link but even that, goats find ways of getting in. All the families live at the base of the hills because they get water from the streams flowing down. The water does not reach the lower valley where we are. The guy who sold me the land was frustrated by the lack of water. Right now we are continuing to water by hand. When the community saw what we have done with our farm, they got motivated toward moving to this area. One by one they visited us to request water. I am careful not to induce them or tell them what to do. The best development has to come from them and this will last. We are encouraging them to clear the bushes and start to fence their properties. In this area most people are only planting maize (corn), but some are now talking about planting mangoes, bananas, and paw paws (papaya). We have already motivated over ten farmers to plant bananas in the area. Yes the land is hard dry but with water it is soft and deep and also fertile ground. We are doing soil control so that when there are heavy rains, it does not pull away the top soil. (Watch Samuel’s video promoting vetiver grasses for erosion control.) Thank you to SIA for funding a drip irrigation system, which will benefit the whole community. Timothy will play a role in helping me train others to use drip irrigation, so that more people can grow food in this valley. *As a way to honor elders in Kenya, it is common to call someone Mama or Baba (Father) + name of their first-born. Kigen is the eldest child of Samuel and Rhoda, and so they are called Mama Kigen and Baba Kigen by their friends. Water tanks Sunrise #farming #sustainableagriculture #kenya #teimuge

Meet Fred, Founder of Kiserem Epilepsy Foundation

Meet Fred, Founder of Kiserem Epilepsy Foundation

Fred Kiserem (pictured below) was working in a café in Iraq when he suddenly fell down and started jerking. When he woke up, a friend from Uganda told him that it looked like kifafa – epilepsy. This was Fred’s first seizure, and he thought that at 27 he was too young for epilepsy. To find out more, Fred returned home to Kenya. After another seizure that landed him in the hospital, he sent up a prayer to God that if he got out of the hospital, he would start an organization for people with epilepsy. The Kiserem Epilepsy Foundation, started in 2016, is a community organization in Githurai just 40km northeast of Nairobi. It supports over 300 people with epilepsy and their caregivers, sharing information about causes of epilepsy, triggers of seizures, and first aid dos and don’ts. Fred, along with his wife, Kristin (who helps with project management), and Yvonne (who is the administrator and computer teacher) have also set up a vocational training program. This program gives practical skills like tailoring, carpentry, and computer skills to people with epilepsy, helping them to move ahead in life. Fred is well-known as a resource for seizures and epilepsy in his neighborhood of Mwihoko. He has a way of talking about epilepsy that normalizes the condition and puts people at ease. People come to him to ask about where they can go for diagnosis, and to find out about treatment. Sometimes Fred comes across people who believe the seizures are caused by demons and they want to hold prayer vigils to get rid of them. Fred tells them, “you can pray for healing, and then still go to the doctor.” In order to break down the stigma around epilepsy and seizures, the Foundation hosts awareness campaigns in local elementary schools and in churches. “If we talk about seizures regularly, people will know what is happening when they see a friend or family member start jerking.” SIA Partners to Support Kiserem Epilepsy Foundation Medication is effective in treating epilepsy but many people with epilepsy in Kenya are unable to get medical care or pay for the medications. This is where Spirit in Action comes into the picture! A SIA grant to Kiserem Epilepsy Foundation in December 2020 helped them establish a poultry project. This project is a vocational training program for 100 women with epilepsy and their caregivers. Each week, one person is selected to care for the chickens, learning how to feed them, keep them healthy, and clean the coop (saving the manure for gardens!). It is also an income-generating project for the Foundation. The broiler chickens will mature after two months and they have already arranged to sell the meat to a hotel. The profits will help them distribute medicine to those who cannot afford it. Fred and his team are a great example of how SIA partners are deeply rooted in community and passionate about serving those around them to create a better future. “Once you empower someone, they will go onto help another,” says Fred, embodying the SIA principle of the ripple of Sharing the Gift. They have a big vision of reaching more than ten thousand with epilepsy in the next ten years and we are proud to join them in this important work. Women learning to sew dresses at the Kiserem Epilepsy Training Centre #epilepsyawareness #communitybasedorganization #kenya #poultry #vocationaltraining

2 photo updates & a short video

2 photo updates & a short video

1. Joshua & Fastina's Fish Farm in Malawi Manyamula Village is hours away from Lake Malawi, so the only fish that arrives there is dried. Joshua and Fastina saw the opportunity to sell fresh fish. They used a SIA Small Business Fund grant of $150 to stock their newly-dug fish pond in Manyamula, Malawi last year. The business has been so successful that they have expanded to three fish ponds, started beekeeping, and sent their daughter to a private school. They have Shared the Gift by giving fish fingerlings to three families. Joshua and Fastina's fish farm helps Manyamula residents add protein and diversity to their diets! 2. Financial Services for Women in Rural Uganda Most women in Uganda have a side-hustle: selling vegetables from their kitchen garden or farm, or buying cloth or kitchen items in bulk and re-selling them in their village. Sharon, a leader of Universal Love Alliance in Uganda, met with rural women last month as part of their outreach to widows. She laid the groundwork for starting a savings and credit group for these women who otherwise cannot access financial services for their micro-enterprises through the banks. 3. "The Answer is Local" 3-Minute Video I loved this short video about the power of local networks to create positive change in the world. "Too often development is something done to communities, rather than with them or by them." This misses out on local resources and local solutions! #shiftthepower #uganda #malawi #positivechange #fish #smallbusinessfund #businesssuccess #sharingthegift

"Abundant Life for All"

"Abundant Life for All"

I woke up to the news of the violence against eight people, including six women of Asian descent, in Atlanta, Georgia. In some ways, it may seem that this news is unrelated to Spirit in Action’s work. But as I thought about it more, I could see how confronting this hate is tied to the work of our organization and of our partners. This incident is only the most recent incident of violence against people of Asian descent. As I read more, I learned Asian people all over the world have felt increased hostility. This seem to be a result of the hateful rhetoric connecting the coronavirus pandemic to China. These hateful acts are not only in the United States. Anti-Asian racism also exists in African countries, where Chinese and Indians are seen as outsiders, even though many have lived there for generations. Sex workers and LGBTI+ people are also often targets for violence, both within their families and in the community. Spirit in Action supports organizations that are working with victims of violence, and organizations that are promoting tolerance, understanding, and peace. MILCOT in Uganda is working to help women, many who are sex workers, rebuild lives after gender-based violence. Universal Love Alliance trains youth on accepting all people and encourages pastors to preach acceptance of LGBTI+ people. Empowering Communities as Actors for Transforming Societies (e-CATS) holds Listening Circle workshops to teach non-violence and conflict resolution in the urban informal settlements of Nairobi, Kenya. The SIA North American Board is also continuing to do work to uncover unconscious bias and to question the legacy of colonialism that is built into the aid and charity sector. Learning about the experiences of others, listening to how they experience the world, and recognizing our blind spots are all necessary steps in Spirit in Action’s mission to fulfill God’s promise for abundant life for all, and our vision for all people to live up to their full potential. No matter where you are in the world, no matter your skin color or orientation, there is work to do to get more comfortable with people who are different, and to confront the ways that each of us have benefited from privileges that lift us up at the expense of others. Thank you for joining us in this sacred and holy work. #justice #civilrights #socialjustice #humanrights

Expanding the Mothers' Support Programme in Kenya

Expanding the Mothers' Support Programme in Kenya

Women around Turbo in Western Kenya are excited about the Mothers’ Support Programme expanding in their rural district. The program is the creation of Benter, Lizette, and Rhoda – the leaders of the Visionary Women’s Centre -- and it has the effect of increasing self-confidence and building a sense of pride in the women who participate. The women also improve the nutritional and economic opportunities for themselves and their families. 110 mothers and grandmothers are now participating, divided into eight smaller groups of thirteen to seventeen members. The groups meet regularly and learn how to start an organic garden and raise chickens. Overall, the Mothers’ Support Programme is supporting over 700 family members in their community. Rhoda, Davis and Benter are part of the Visionary Women's Centre leadership team Before being able to join the Mothers’ Support Programme, women must organize themselves into neighborhood groups and successfully complete the Table Banking savings program. For Table Banking, the women receive a clay piggy-bank which they fill weekly with any savings they get from sales of vegetables or odd-jobs. At the end of the year there is a celebration and the banks are smashed open! The women then use their savings for investing in chicks or paying for school fees for their children. “This project has had the most remarkable effect on everyone involved,” says Lizette, who is co-founder of VWC and lives in Canada. “It has inspired and stretched the Visionary Women’s Centre team to have the opportunity to bring such a wonderful gift to "our mothers.”” Planning for the Future There is great interest in the program, and so the VWC team has carefully designed a plan for slow and steady expansion of the program within the community. “We take two new groups per year," Lizette explains. "Once a group has been followed for five years with a gradual decrease in supervision, they will become part of the VWC MSP Alumnae. This allows for on-going contact and support from VWC but in a way that we can continue both to expand as well as honour our commitment to established groups.” The Visionary Women’s Centre is one of SIA’s multi-year partners, which means that the SIA Board has approved three consecutive years of funding. This allows VWC to plan future expansion without immediate funding concerns. Our multi-year commitment also helps VWC in their fundraising from other groups. This year the VWC team is making inroads into local fundraising initiatives, receiving support from a local gym and a bank branch in Eldoret, Kenya. As a way of Sharing the Gift, Lizette and Benter helped present at a Zoom training call for SIA partners last week! Twenty SIA partners from Eastern Africa attended the training to learn how to pitch their organizations to both international and local funders. Tanya and Barbara Deal visiting the Visionary Women's Centre in 2019. We were welcomed by the organizing team, who served us watermelon and told us about their vision for the future. #kenya #women #savings #localorganizations

"Our partners know best what they need"

"Our partners know best what they need"

It’s not often that international aid is featured on the editorial pages of a major newspaper. So I was excited and pleasantly surprised to see the New York Times Editorial Board write the opinion Foreign aid is having a reckoning. The authors start by outlining the problem. For example, “planeloads of free American corn can help famine victims in the short term, but they can also put local farmers out of business, making the food supply in the long term more precarious.” Aid is not neutral. It impacts local politics. Beatrice with her potato field and Ruth with her passion fruit crop. These two women are SIA Small Business Fund farmers. Painting people who receive support as helpless victims distorts reality and creates a stark power dynamic where donors get to see themselves as “saviors.” If we really believe that Black lives matter, then the reckoning is necessary. The opinion piece quotes Degan Ali, an activist in Nairobi, who wants humanitarian funding to be a “direct as possible.” She advocates for turning away from top-down model, toward shared decision-making and flexible funding. International fundraising “should be based on amplifying the dynamic work our communities themselves are engaged in.” Our Reckoning If you’ve been following Spirit in Action for a while, you’ve probably seen some of this “reckoning” in action. Our mission statement recognizes that “our partners know best what they need and can create the change they envision.” To live into that mission, our funding goes directly to community-based organizations like Kakuuto Development Initiative and Midwife-Led Community Transformation, amplifying their work. These organizations are doing the work before our funding arrives, not waiting for a savior. In addition, this year we’re piloting a new initiative of multi-year funding grants. For organizations like Flaming Chalice in Burundi, knowing that they will receive funding for three years creates stability and allows them to hire a local coordinator for all their activities. Manasse, pictured here, used to be a volunteer for Flaming Chalice and the SIA grant means he can now dedicate his full attention to the work. The funding commitment from Spirit in Action also makes their group more attractive to other funders. The pandemic canceled my trip to Kenya last year and nudged Spirit in Action to rely even more on the local expertise of our African Advisory Board members. One of the un-used and about-to-expire flight credits in Kenya is able to be transferred from me to Wambui Nguyo. She is already in the country and can make the visits that I had planned last year. It’s a long way from Opinion pages to real change, but it’s exciting to see these practices that we’ve seen work so well make it into the mainstream conversation! Wambui Nguyo is a trainer, organizer, and African Advisory Board member in Nairobi, Kenya. #localorganizations #grassroots #shiftthepower #mutualaid #multiyearfunding

Successful group therapy for young women in Uganda

Successful group therapy for young women in Uganda

When the social workers and psychological counselors from Midwife-Led Community Transformation (MILCOT) organization did an assessment of the young women in their community of Nansana Municipality, Uganda, they found an alarming number of girls who were in violent relationships and experiencing forms of sexual coercion. MILCOT is a SIA partner and community-based organization with the mission to take midwifery services out of the clinic setting and bring it direct to the community. Even during COVID lockdowns, the MILCOT team answered texts and phone calls from girls aged 10-24 about sexual and reproductive health issues. One of the MILCOT team members interviews household members to identify the needs in the community. Last year, MILCOT used funding for SIA to form two support groups for these girls living in dangerous situations and experiencing depression. Each group of eight members got together for a series of eight workshops using the Social Emotional Economic Empowerment through Knowledge of Group Support Psychotherapy (SEEK-GSP) Model. This model aims to treat mild or moderate depression and anxiety among those stuck in inter-generational cycles of poverty. (Those with severe depression were referred to psychiatrists for professional care.) The SEEK-GSP model aims to educate group members about depression, provide them with a supportive environment for exploring trauma, and developing positive coping and problem-solving skills. After sharing their traumatic experiences, the group members offered suggestions and encouragement, to help each young woman know she is not alone in her struggles. “We have seen that the SEEK-GSP model brought smiles on the faces of two groups of women and girls,” writes Caroline Nakanyike and Harriet Nayiga, MILCOT leaders. “Also, by coming up with income generating projects they have boosted their individual and family economic status.” Each girl was given $10 in start-up capital to start businesses selling fish, vegetables, or tea and baked goods along the roadside. (Pictured above is a group starting a frying business.) The groups also are joint savings clubs. “Team No Stress” has collectively saved USD$20! Harriet Nayiga was recognized as a Young Midwife Leader by the International Confederation of Midwives. Read her interview here: https://nursesandmidwiveslead.org/bringing-midwifery-services-to-the-community/ After completing the therapy sessions in September, the MILCOT team conducted a post-therapy assessment. They noted the following successes: Improved emotional wellbeing of members and their families; Reduced dependence and intimate partner violence, with enhanced creative and problem solving skills; Increased interest and task commitment; Increased trust amongst themselves that enabled support for each other; Enhanced patience, persistent of effort, self-assurance, determination, and responsibility; Improved individual and family income; Gratitude for acquired free knowledge in self-care, record and book keeping and saving culture. The outcome of these sessions is a general improvement of well-being, including renewed energy for activities that allow them to express their talents. One member resurrected her childhood interest in basketry, which has contributed to her household income with less stress! #uganda #girls #encouragement #skillstraining #savings #socialwork

Supporting the whole family in Uganda

Supporting the whole family in Uganda

Throughout the pandemic and national elections in Uganda, grassroots organizations like KADI-U are continuing their community-level activities to make sure everyone has enough food and is on the path to a better life. (See all our current partner organizations.) I was so excited after reading their report to SIA of their activities in the last few months of the year. The volunteers who run KADI are so dedicated to making sure no one in their community is left behind. One of the themes of the report was the benefit of making partnerships with other local organizations. “We have learned that partnerships with like-minded institutions lead to achievement of great results with limited use of resources since costs are shared,” reports Robert Sebunya, a social worker and KADI-U volunteer. Here are some of the highlights: Supporting Farmers In October through December, KADI-U has increased it acreage for the agribusiness. While the families who live here are familiar with growing food for themselves, it is a shift to think of growing crops to also have some to sell for profit. Now they are starting farming business in soybeans, potatoes, cassava and maize. KADI-U is partnering with the nearby Bakyabumba Farmers’ Cooperative Society. The cooperative owns a tractor that KADI-U farmers will be able to hire at subsidized rates. Previously all the ploughing would be done all by hand, or with a rented oxen team. So the tractor will allow much more land to be ready for farming. Improved potato stems were distributed to the farmers for planting in the October and those potatoes should be ready to harvest this month. KADI-U members have continued to build and use the granaries (pictured above) at their homesteads, which are very helpful in storing the larger harvest of agribusiness crops. Tailoring Another partnership that KADI-U has forged this year is with the Obulamu Bwebugagga Training Center, where sixteen of the adolescent girls from Kakuuto village are going to learn tailoring skills. KADI-U used part of a SIA grant to buy three sewing machines and tailoring materials that the girls are using during this training. The Training Centre provides the trainer and food and accommodation for the trainees for the three months of the training. At the end of the three months the girls will know how to make dresses and shirts and they will take home a certificate showing that they have completed the training. No One Left Behind Last month, KADI-U did a survey of households that have children with disabilities in the four parishes of their county. They met twenty-three people – both children and adults – with varying disabilities. KADI-U has formed a partnership with Fathers Heart Mobility Ministry to distribute seventeen wheelchairs to help those with mobility needs get around on their own. #uganda #training #skills #empowerment #farmers #disabilites #SIApartners

Happy New Year! Welcome to SIA's 25th year!

Happy New Year! Welcome to SIA's 25th year!

Happy New Year! Last year was a big one for Spirit in Action. We gave $18,800 to 20 partner organizations for emergency COVID-19 responses. We experimented with a new grant review system, using the local expertise of the African Advisory Board, and have over 20 grant partners for this year! We had online meetings with the North American Board and African Advisory Board. We also highlighted more African voices on the blog, and got a new website (waaaay back in April). I’m starting this year with the deep understanding that we cannot know what the year will bring. And even so, I have big dreams for Spirit in Action as we celebrate our 25th anniversary! Exploring a multi-year funding model to better support the stability of our grant partners and reduce the stress on their leaders. As part of this, I’ll be highlighting on the blog some of the amazing staff people who keep these grassroots organizations thriving. Meeting with some of the amazing women from Universal Love Alliance, supporting rural women in Uganda in 2019. Increase the diversity of people in our decision-making, as well as examining our unconscious bias and the colonialist tendencies in development and international philanthropy. Staying true to our roots by continuing to focus on building relationships and encouraging our partners. We’ll do this by hosting online workshops about topics that interest our grant partners, and having our African Advisory Board check in regularly with new grant partners. I’ll also be looking for new ways of grant reporting that give partner organizations useful information for improving, and give donors a true picture of what change is happening. Finally, instead of celebrating 25 years of SIA in person, we’ll get creative to find ways throughout the year to honor our past and dream large for the future. Thank you for being part of Spirit in Action in 2021! Picture left: Leaders from Visionary Women's Fund in Kenya are social workers and community development specialists.

Our Dreams for SIA

Our Dreams for SIA

Last year, at the conference in Kenya where we dreamed up the African Advisory Board, I asked those gathered about their vision for SIA. I asked, “What’s your wildest dream for SIA?” Out of the conversation, we honed in on a tagline for our work: “SIA is social and economic justice not charity, with God in the center.” What else do we dream for Spirit in Action? Canaan Gondwe (Malawi): To see change in the people we work with. Better livelihoods. Abundant life. To see change that is sustainable; change that comes from within. I dream that SIA continues to be a learning organization and have wider horizons. To learn from our mistakes. To see the challenges, and learn from them. To learn how to have greater impact with the small resources we have. Naomi Ayot (Uganda): To improve our skills, and help people with their reporting. I dream that the funding sources to SIA increase. That there is an increase of people who trust in the vision of SIA and invest in the programs. I see that SIA has a unique oneness and love in the communities we serve. I see women empowering women. We are creating one big SIA movement – with participatory social justice. Samuel Teimuge (Kenya): I dream of continued training and mentoring for partners. And more regular communication between partners and SIA office. We are sharing the successes, celebrating lifting someone’s life, which motivates us all. Dennis Kiprop (Kenya): I see SIA as a vehicle for social and economic justice. People are saying, “I can take my child to a better clinic. I can learn to write.” SIA can help bring justice. Wambui Nguyo (Kenya): I dream of having a thriving savings and loans group in Koch (slum community), following on the model of COMSIP in Malawi. I want people to have a different kind of life. I know it can be done. I want to always encourage people to keep moving forward and see a different future. Barbara Deal (USA): To increase the donor base and budget so more grants can be made. I want donors to understand the power of our partners. Tanya Cothran (SIA Office): to build a wider network, sharing with other NGOs and government agencies that work in the same areas as we do. I dream that there can be space for openness to try new things and learn from those experiences. My dream is to move us even more towards working for justice, not charity. Blessed holidays from all of us as Spirit in Action! See you in the New Year, when we’ll continue our dreaming, learning, and giving! Make your year-end contribution to SIA here. Celebrating prosperity in Aboke, Uganda. #aab #dreaming #inspiration #justice